"The First Family of Instagram," The New York Times, by Caroline Moss, December 31, 2015. "Ms. Phillips is the matriarch of what may be called the First Family of Instagram. In addition to the @food handle, she has another account, @UglyProduceIsBeautiful, which has more than 44,000 followers. Her son, Tom Eswein, 29, is behind @realestate, with its modest but growing following of 3,800. (Until recently, he worked on @food with his mom, but they recently decided to separate their @interests because family is complicated.) Her daughter, Liz Eswein, 25, is the force behind @newyorkcity, which has 1.1 million followers. "

1 - 6 -2015 Meet the ‘first family of Instagram’ on the TODAY Show, NBC News Channel 4
Sarah Phillips, her son Tom Eswein, and her daughter Liz Eswein join Carson Daly in the Orange Room to talk about their popular Instagram posts, saying color, light and clarity are key to a perfect shot.

1-27-2015 MEET the First Family of Instagram who make money by documenting their day-to-day lives, Barcroft Media

Guardian, UK: Sarah Phillips named ONE of the 30 World's Greatest Bakers.

craftybaking.com named "the best of the web" - Saveur Magazine

craftybaking.com named as one of Gourmet Magazine's top 95 favorite food websites and blogs!

Guardian, UK: craftybaking.com, home to some of the best baking know-how on the net..."

Washington Post: "...this is one useful Web site"

Chicago Tribune: "craftybaking.com: an excellent resource for home cooks".

Los Angeles Times:  "craftybaking.com (is) filled with good information and is easy to use. It (has) solid baking information..."

New York Times: "...directions can be found at craftybaking.com".

CNN NEWS: "...visit craftybaking.com"

New York Times “Cake: The Essentials”, Weekly Blogger (2009 - 2010)

Special to washingtonpost.com, "What's Cooking", by Kim O'Donnel, Washington Post, April 10, 2007, "For the cake baker: the CraftyBaking Website has a section that lists pan sizes and their volumes which can be helpful when adjusting a recipe....Kim O'Donnel: Thanks. I like the CraftyBaking site as well, quite useful."

"Free Range on Food, Crummy Valentine's Treats," The Food Section of the Washington Post, February 14, 2007, (QUESTION) "I made a bread recipe designed to produced two loaves of bread....The 1st day's loaf was about 1-2" in higher than the 2nd day's loaf. Any idea why the diff? thanks! (ANSWER) Leigh: It sounds like the main difference is the chilling time. According to Chelsea Lincoln from Bob's Red Mill, the cooler temperature retards the yeast... She also recommends a web site for further bread baking questions. www.CraftyBaking.com with a specific link to bread you may find helpful for trouble shooting in the future. "Special to washingtonpost.com, "What's Cooking", by Kim O'Donnel, Washington Post, April 10, 2007, "For the cake baker: the CraftyBaking Website has a section that lists pan sizes and their volumes which can be helpful when adjusting a recipe....Kim O'Donnel: Thanks. I like the CraftyBaking site as well, quite useful."

Explore Chocolate: Chocolate Glossary, Nestles Chocolatier, uses CraftyBaking.com as a direct source for tempering and chocolate information

"Blog Watch", The Wall Street Journal, Katherine Meyer, April 3, 2006, page R9, "Renowned chocolate chef David Lebovitz's blog is a mix of everyday musings sprinkled with fascinating food trivia, recipes and mouth-watering photos of decadent desserts...Check out the "chocolate-almond butter crunch toffee" and "pumpkin chocolate chip ring (by Sarah Phillips, CraftyBaking.com)."

"The Way We Eat: Free Ranging", New York Times, Amanda Hesser, December 18, 2005, "To coat with chocolate, melt the chocolate in a double boiler (temper it if you want the coating to have polish; directions can be found at CraftyBaking.com)".

"Still can't get enough...(For) more cookie techniques, help, trivia, and history (go to): CraftyBaking's Cookies 101", Martha's Cookies 101 by the Kitchen's of Martha Stewart, 12-05 Julia Child was the other source mentioned.

"What's Cooking Holiday", Special to washingtonpost.com, by Kim O'Donnel, 12-8-05, "You might check out CraftyBaking , which has tips on how to prevent spreading (chocolate chip cookies). I have found the tips on this to be invaluable! Kim O'Donnel: Agreed...this is one useful Web site. Thanks."

Chicago Tribune, 11-2-05 writes: 
"CraftyBaking.com: an excellent resource for home cooks".

Rescue Your Holiday Baking
Does your holiday baking need a rescue? Maybe you need to call CraftyBaking. 
US Newswire / Radio News Feature / GoodNews

CraftyBaking.com's 
"Information is first-rate...
Great troubleshooting tips 
for the novice and seasoned baker alike". 

One of 6 favorite food websites selected by 
Cooking Light Magazine, April, 2005, page 162, circulation 11 million subscribers (Other websites: foodnetwork.com, allrecipes.com, foodsubs.com, egullet.org, cookinglight.com)

Los Angeles Times Review Special Christmas Section (12-16-01) by Carla Williams: CraftyBaking.com (is) filled with good information and is easy to use. It (has) solid baking information along with 4 other sites: General Mills, Land O'Lakes, Nestle and Pillsbury. 
Story reprinted, ktla, 2005

"Holiday Help Lines"Gazette (CO), 12-06, 12-18-05, 11-30-04, "Here’s where to go for culinary help during the holiday season... Baking: verybestbaking.com,CraftyBaking.com and landolakes.com..."

"Cake Decorating", CNN News - Comcast ~ Seeking Solutions with Suzanne, "Did you know there are three types of fondant, the sugar paste used to create edible animals? For more fondant facts and recipes, visit 
CraftyBaking.com!"

CHICAGO TRIBUNE REVIEWS & MENTIONS:
"Sweet discovery summons childhood memories," Chicago Tribune, by Donna Pierce, July 5, 2006, "[Sarah Phillips] shows how to measure a pan's volume and depth by filling it with water to see how much batter it can hold. Using this method, you can figure the number of small pans needed based on the batter used in the larger pan. "Be careful substituting a pan when the recipe indicates that a tube pan should be used, such as an angel food cake pan or a bundt pan," she writes. "Generally the recipe requires this type of pan so the heat is distributed properly."

"Dressing up: Easy, fun strategies turn ordinary Easter cakes into something special", Chicago Tribune, By Robin Mather Jenkins, 4-06, "Shredded coconut, granulated sugar and confectioner's sugar are simple to tint, which makes them even more versatile in decorating. These tips are from CraftyBaking.com."

"Q. Please give me advice about replacing other ingredients with applesauce in baked goods. I remember hearing that I could do this, but don't know how.", Chicago Tribune, By Donna Pierce, 3-8-06, "A. Applesauce often is used to replace fat in baked goods, but substituting it in recipes can be tricky, writes Sarah Phillips in "Baking 9-1-1." It's easiest, she writes, to substitute it in baked goods that use oil, not butter. Candidates include many quick breads, muffins or some cakes, such as carrot cake. When a recipe calls for 1 cup of oil, substitute 3/4 cup applesauce," she writes. "Also add 2 tablespoons vegetable oil for better flavor and mouthfeel. She cautions that you also may need to use additional flavoring, some baking soda to offset the acidic applesauce, and a low-gluten flour.

"Keep paraffin out of the candy jar"Chicago Tribune, By Donna Pierce, 11-2-05, "Some older recipes for dipped candy call for melting paraffin with chocolate to make it firmer and give it a nice sheen upon cooling," writes Sarah Phillips on her Web site, CraftyBaking.com, an excellent resource for home cooks. However, she adds, "The labels on most paraffin boxes state it is not for human consumption, but it is still used."

"Get the scoop on scoops", Chicago Tribune (syndicated Knight-Ridder Newspapers), Renee Enna, 6-05-05, "The Web site www.CraftyBaking.com offers these tips for perfect scoops."

"How best to butter up your cookie batter"Chicago Tribune, Donna Pierce, 1-5-05, 
"Several questions regarding the role of butter and other fats in cookie recipes have rolled into the test kitchen. Q: How do you judge the correct temperature and texture in recipes that require "room temperature" butter — and how do you soften butter quickly. A: For baking considerations, butter at room temperature should register between 65-68 degrees when an instant-read thermometer is inserted in the center of the stick. At this temperature, the butter is firm but leaves an indention when gently pressed. In "CraftyBaking," author Sarah Phillips describes room-temperature butter as firm but bendable, with a shiny but not greasy surface. "

"Get Answers to Cookie Questions", Chicago Tribune, Donna Pierce, 12-16-04, "It's holiday cookie season, and several questions regarding the role of butter and other fats in cookie recipes have rolled into the test kitchen...For baking considerations, room temperature butter should register 65-68 degrees when an instant-read thermometer is inserted in the center of the stick. At this temperature, the butter is firm but leaves an indention when gently pressed. In CraftyBaking (Fireside, 2003), author Sarah Phillips describes room-temperature butter as firm but bendable, with a shiny but not greasy surface."

CHICAGO (IL) TRIBUNE/ Knight-Ridder/Tribune Syndicated, 2-2-04 - (scroll to food) "Baking 9-1-1" (Fireside, $14) offers how-to's for hundreds of cooking techniques and conundrums (from breads and spongecakes to emergency substitutions and culinary rescue missions). Author Sarah Phillips offers dozens of recipes, including one for fantastic oatmeal-raisin cookies. (cdm) 2004

"A cookie worth making"Chicago Tribune, April 21, 2004, "If sweet and chewy translates to cookie bliss, the Jumbo Oatmeal Raisin Cookies from "Baking 9-1-1" (Fireside, $14) (by Sarah Phillips) are a perfect treat. The high oven temperature causes the cookies to puff and set on the outside before the inside sets completely, making a thicker cookie, writesauthor Sarah Phillips, who also advises not to overbake these treats. When we made them in the test kitchen, tasters marveled at the crispy exterior that yielded to a soft and flavorful interior. (Recipe was reprinted without mentioning the use of all-purpose flour (spoon into measuring cup and level to top).

"Fat Tuesday treats to buy -- and make at home", Brenda Wallace, Chicago Tribune, 2-18-04 (see second Q and A), 
Q. I bake and also purchase artisan-type breads, which I keep in the refrigerator to avoid spoilage. I recently purchased a breadbox thinking it had qualities to prevent mold. Is a breadbox supposed to keep breads fresh and prevent spoilage? Or is there something I should put into the box along with the bread? --Dorothy Litwin, Skokie

A. Breadboxes will do the job for short periods of time, writes Laurel Robertson in "The Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book": "If the bread will be eaten in a day or two, it is best stored loosely wrapped at cool room temperature . . . or kept in an old-fashioned breadbox, which offers a cool, dry environment." But make sure the breadbox is ventilated, Robertson writes, and keep it clean between loaves to prevent mold spores from "passing from one batch to the other."

Should you wish to keep bread longer than a day or two, breadboxes don't offer the most ideal storage solution, according to Sarah Phillips in "Baking 9-1-1." And forget about the refrigerator, which dries out bread and hastens staleness, she adds.

For longer bread storage, the freezer is your best bet: Tightly wrapped bread can be kept 2 to 3 months with good results. Frozen bread thaws quickly. And pre-slicing before freezing allows convenient retrieval of a few slices at a time.

"KITCHEN CONNECTION FROM THE TEST KITCHEN - Tapioca to the rescue", Chicago Tribune, Donna Pierce, 2-4-04, "... fruit fillings benefit from the use of instant tapioca as a thickener. They don't require stirring and don't get cloudy as they do when flour is used. from "Baking 9-1-1," author Sarah Phillips ."

"Thickeners vary a bit," Detriot Free Press, by Susan Selansky, April 11, 2007, "QUESTION: What would make my baking sheets warp? -- Helen Engels, Inkster. ANSWER: The baking sheets might not be thick, heavy duty or high quality. Sarah Phillips, CEO and founder of www.CraftyBaking.com, explained in an e-mail: "Cookie sheets naturally warp with use, anyway, because they are just sheets of metal. Some companies like Calphalon insert steel rods along all four sides to prevent this."

"CraftyBaking.com- If you like baking, our Web site of the day is a real find." News Channel 5, St Louis. March 28, 2007, "Check out CraftyBaking.com. You'll find reliable and tested recipes for Easter and Passover, free advice about your baking problems and real life rescues from recipe disasters. There are also baking classes online, which you have to pay for, but there is plenty of free material."

"www.food, What did we ever do before the Web?," St. Paul and Pioneer Press, Kathie Jenkins, March 15, 2007, "What did we ever do before the Web? That's a question....Below are our favorites. Check them out.  CraftyBaking.com: Besides recipes, this site has good technique and how-to instructions, ingredient information, free advice from experts and lots of tips. If you look up something like walnuts, the site explains how to blanch, how to toast, what to substitute. There's also a members' photo gallery, so you can post your baking creations."

"The Story of Dutch Cocoa," Newsday and published nationwide (ie: San Jose Mercury News, CABaltimore Sun, MD; etc), by Erica Marcus, February 21, 2007, "Before I started researching this column, I was under the impression that Dutch-process cocoa was a) more richly flavored than "natural" cocoa and b) more easily soluble in water. I know now that I was mistaken, and I credit these sources for opening my eyes: "Bittersweet: Recipes and Tales From a Life in Chocolate" by Alice Medrich (Artisan) and ...excellent Web sites: CraftyBaking.com...."

"Free Range on Food, Crummy Valentine's Treats," The Food Section of the Washington Post, February 14, 2007, (QUESTION) "I made a bread recipe designed to produced two loaves of bread. Since I only have one loaf pan, I baked one loaf on the day I made the dough. For the second loaf, after the 1st rising, I put it in a zip lock bag and placed it in the refrigerator. The following day, I put it in the pan, let it rise for a few hours till it was near the top of the pan and baked it (the dough was cool to the touch when I baked it). I compared the two baked loaves. The 1st day's loaf was about 1-2" in higher than the 2nd day's loaf. Any idea why the diff? thanks (ANSWER) Leigh: It sounds like the main difference is the chilling time. According to Chelsea Lincoln from  Bob's Red Mill, the cooler temperature retards the yeast. It needs the warmth to gain elasticity and work with the gluten in the flour. If you bring the dough fully to room temperature and allow it to rise again you will likely get good results. She also recommends a web site for further bread baking questions.www.CraftyBaking.com with a specific link to bread you may find helpful for trouble shooting in the future."

"Rolling in the Dough," Press-Enterprise, Janet Zimmerman, January 16, 2007, The smell of fresh-baked bread laced with honey fills the cramped kitchen at Riverside's Jammin' Bread....Bread Terms from CraftyBaking.com."

"Ethnic coffee cakes a staple in Pennsylvania kitchens," Pittsburgh Tribune Review, by Karin Welzel, December 31, 2006, These ethnic coffee cakes and sweet breads are perfect to serve for breakfast, brunch, afternoon tea, a snack or even as dessert. Baba, Babka: A Polish sweet bread or cake with dried fruits, candied peel and nuts that is soaked in rum or cherry brandy. It is baked in a fluted pan so the bottom resembles a woman's skirt. Supposedly invented by Polish King Stanislaus Lesczyinski in the 1600s, who soaked stale kugelhopf in rum and name the dessert after Ali Baba, the storybook hero; Bienenstich (Bee Sting Cake): Cake layers made from yeast dough or leavened batter that are filled with custard or jam and covered with a honey- or sugar-based topping and nuts. From Germany; Chelsea buns: Square yeast rolls flavored with warm spices and fruit and coated with sugar. Developed by the Chelsea Bun House, a bakery in London, England, that opened for business in the 1700s. They resemble American cinnamon rolls. The Chelsea Bun House also was famous for hot cross buns, traditionally served on Good Friday; Christopsomo: A Christmas egg bread from Greece flavored with anise. The dough is shaped into large round loaves and decorated with the sign of an early Christian cross; Kolachy: Sweet yeast buns filled with poppy seeds, nuts, jam, or mashed fruit; origins are Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia; Kugelhopf (Gugelhopf): An Austrian sweet bread/cake that can be made from a yeast dough or a batter leavened with baking powder. Characterized by baking in a molded pan that's called a Turk's Head Pan (turban-shaped with swirled sides). This usually contains dried fruits and citrus peel. Bakers in Germany, Poland and Alsace, France, often claim it as their own invention; Kulich: A sweet yeast bread of Russian origins, shaped in a tall cylinder. It often is flavored with raisins, candied fruit and saffron and features a confectioners' sugar icing; Moravian sugar cake: A yeast-based sweet, flat coffee cake, topped with sugar, popularized by the Moravians, who migrated from present-day Czech Republic and settled in Pennsylvania. Characterized by indentations in the dough, into which syrup is poured before baking; Pannetone: This is the dome-shaped Christmas bread of Italy, made from a yeast sponge and a variety of liquor-soaked dried fruits and citrus peel. Recipes vary from region to region; the bread usually is baked in a high-sided pan, but a springform pan can be used; Potica: Thinly stretch yeast dough filled with ground walnuts and cooked in honey and milk. Originated in Bohemia and Slovenia; Stollen, Dresden Stollen, Christstollen: A traditional German yeast bread studded with nuts and dried fruit; Streusel Kuchen: There's no one recipe for this German coffeecake -- made from yeast dough or a baking powder batter -- but all of them feature a crumb topping. They often are baked in Bundt pans.

Sources: CraftyBaking.com; "Food Lover's Companion" (Barron's Educational Series, Third Edition, $16.95 paperback) by Sharon Tyler Herbst; "Christmas 101: Celebrate the Holiday Season -- from Christmas to New Year's" (Broadway Books, 1999 paperback) by Rick Rodgers."

"Kitchen Hotlines to the Rescue," Colorado Gazette, December, 2006, "BAKING: www.verybestbaking.com, www.CraftyBaking.com, www.landolakes.com..."

"Truth about scalding," Herald Tribune, by Linda Brandt, December 20, 2006, "Older recipes called for scalding milk for two reasons: to kill bacteria and to eliminate an enzyme that keeps it from thickening in recipes. According to ochef.com, scalding to accomplish those two things is no longer necessary as virtually all milk sold in the U.S. is pasteurized, which kills bacteria and the enzyme. Another Web site, baking 911.com, notes that some recipes may ask you to scald and cool milk just to be sure it is at a good temperature (110-115 F) for combining with other ingredients. Shirley O. Corriher, a food scientist and author of "Cookwise" (Morrow, 1997), noticed that when she didn't scald milk for certain bread recipes, the bread didn't rise as high as it did when she used scalded milk."

"A gingerbread cottage by the sea," The Orange County Register, by Lisa Mertins, December 14, 2006, "During the hectic, out-of-control holiday season, what could be a better project than attempting to create a gingerbread house? Sources: www.CraftyBaking.com for fondant recipe."

"Bundt baking," Worcester Telegram & Gazette Corp., by Barbara M. Houle, December 6, 2006, "About Nordic Ware: The aluminum Bundt pan was invented by H. David Dalquist, founder of Nordic Ware Bundt Pans, at the request of a Hadassah group in Minneapolis. The women wanted a pan that could be used to make kugel, according to CraftyBaking.com. Dalquist created the pan, which they named “bund,” German for a gathering of people. Dalquist added a “t” to the end of “bund” and trademarked the name."

"Website of the Month, December, 2006: CraftyBaking - Candy 101: http://www.CraftyBaking.com/candy/101_intro.htm, December, 2006, East Baton Rouge Parish Library, Louisiana

"Dancing with Elephants", PODCAST PICKLE: DWE Episode 033: Live at The Magnificent Mile 2006 Lights Festival, November 19, 2006, "Items featured on this week's show: The Magnificent Mile Walt Disney World Red Frosting Baking 911..."

"Bakery specializes in pies using fruits supplied by customer," Associated Press (Nationwide), Martha Mendoza, November 15, 2006, "I have to say I felt guilty for not baking it myself, but at the same time, pie shells are always a risky business. I can't be sure they'll come out well. For this gift, it just had to look and taste good," said Weckler. Baking maven Sarah Phillips, a cookbook author who runs CraftyBaking.com, said Weckler's pie crust reluctance may be well founded.

"People are afraid of pie crusts and it's understandable," she said. "Pie making is really a skill, and if you only do it once a year at Thanksgiving, you're going to be kind of rusty."

Phillips said pie crusts are easy enough that no one should need to buy pre-made pie crusts. But for those in a hurry, or crust-a-phobic, grocery stores now carry a range of empty pie shells ranging from organic whole wheat crusts to frozen rolled-up versions."

"10 things we learned this week," The Toronto Star, by John Sakamoto, November 12, 2006, "Wednesday is National Bundt Day. The oddly shaped pan was invented in 1950 at the request of members of the Minneapolis Center of the Hadassah Society, who wanted a pan in which to make kugel, a Jewish dessert. " (from CraftyBaking.com)
"Chris Miura's method for baking real-deal pizza at home," The Honolulu Advertiser, a division of Gannett Co, Inc, by  Wanda A. Adams, November 8, 2006, "Bread-making tips from CraftyBaking.com."
"Here's the skinny on heavy cream," Times Union, Albany, by Mary Quinlan, August 23, 2006, " Q: What's the difference between heavy cream and whipping cream?-- Anonymous A: CraftyBaking.com says heavy cream is the richest type of liquid cream with a fat content of at least 36 percent, while whipping cream contains between 30 percent and 36 percent fat.

For whipping, you need a minimum of 30 percent fat. Whipping cream and heavy cream can be substituted for each other, but the higher the fat content, the higher and firmer the cream will whip up, which will give you a thicker and more stable frosting, perfect for piping through a pastry bag.

For ideal whipped cream: Store a metal mixing bowl and mixers in the freezer for 30 minutes. Mix cream until stiff peaks form. Toward the end of whipping, add 1 to 2 tablespoons of superfine or confectioners' sugar per cup of cream and flavorings (such as 1/4 teaspoon almond extract or 1/2 to 1 teaspoon vanilla extract). Don't over whip, or the cream will turn to butter."

"Light Life: Apple Spice Cake," Slash Food, by Nicole Weston, August 8, 2006, "After much testing, cookbook author Sarah Phillips, came up with a whole book of all-natural, low fat recipes, The Healthy Oven Baking Book. This cake is a variation on one of the recipes from that book - and it has almost no fat...The cake itself is very good. It is very moist and has something of an addictive quality about it, so it's a good thing that it is so low in fat. All of the tricks that the author used to avoid denseness, gumminess and toughness worked well, because the cake is none of those things. The spice combination used reminds me distinctly of apple pie, with a slight nuttiness from the whole wheat pastry flour rounding out the flavors. I like it for breakfast or with coffee, but it could be served for dessert, too, perhaps with a small scoop of (low fat) ice cream or frozen yogurt."

"Freeze sorbet, can mulberries, bake a cake", St. Paul/Pioneer Press, by Lynda Kochevar, July 29, 2006, "Q. Can you find a recipe for hummingbird cake? A. This one was originally published in Southern Living magazine in 1978 and was chosen favorite recipe ever in 1990 by that magazine. I found it at www.CraftyBaking.com."

"Different Pan Size, making it work", Baltimore Sun, July 19, 2006, "We found Sarah Phillips' pan-conversion chart (which compares baking-pan size and volume) so handy that we printed a copy from her Web site, CraftyBaking.com..."

Rose Teaches Master Class, Lekue Silicone StyleHarold Import Company, June 22, 2006,  "In June, HIC hosted its first-ever master baking class – co-hosted by Lékué International and taught by the pastry professor emeritus – Rose Levy Beranbaum. At The Institute of Culinary Education, at the stroke of noon our students arrived – 14 editors representing a wide sampling of publications in the gourmet and houseware industries – attendees included Associated Press, CraftyBaking.comCountry LivingFine CookingFood and WineFood Arts MagazineFood CalendarGood HousekeepingGourmet MagazineGourmet Retailer and Saveur along with a number of independent food writers."

"Devil's food cake is a real slice of heaven", Toronto Star, by Susan Sampson, June 19, 2006, "Get back to basics with a festive, homemade cake. The base is a traditional devil's food, light and moist. The icing starts as a chocolate ganache, a classic glaze. Chocolate Birthday Cake. The cake is adapted from an old Joy of Cooking recipe and the icing from CraftyBaking.com."

"Two-Minute Expert: Size matters with Bundt pans," Press Enterprise, May 24, 2006, "If you're unsure how much batter your beautiful Bundt pan will hold, there's a quick way to measure its capacity...Source: CraftyBaking.com."

"ASK THE TEST KITCHEN: Substitution requires care," Detroit Free Press, by Susan Selasky, May 3, 2006, "QUESTION: How can I substitute baking chocolate squares for cocoa powder? -- Lisa Mazzola, Farmington Hills. ANSWER: Unsweetened chocolate squares can be used instead of cocoa powder, but you'll also need to adjust the fat in the recipe. In "Baking 9-1-1" by Sarah Phillips (Fireside, $14), which features frequently asked baking questions and recipes, the author gives this formula when asked how to make a cake more chocolaty: "If a chocolate cake has cocoa powder, substitute about 2 or 3 chocolate squares per recipe." The fat ingredient in the recipe will need to be adjusted because you are adding fat (cocoa butter) in the recipe by using the chocolate squares. Phillips writes that "3 level tablespoons Dutch-process or natural cocoa PLUS 1 tablespoon oil or melted shortening or butter equals 1 square of unsweetened baking chocolate."...Other factors need to be considered when making this substitution, Phillips, CEO and founder of www.CraftyBaking.com, wrote in an e-mail. 'When you exchange the cocoa powder and fat with chocolate squares, it also affects the flour, leaveners, sugar and liquid in the recipe. When you take cocoa powder from a recipe, you have to replace it with flour. Cocoa powder contains starch and helps provide structure. And the butter or fat in the recipe may need to be adjust downwards along with the sugar depending on the type of chocolate used. With the liquid you may need to adjust upwards or downwards.' "

"Dressing up: Easy, fun strategies turn ordinary Easter cakes into something special", 7-Cities Wine and Dine, By Robin Mather Jenkins from the Chicago Tribune, 4-06, "Shredded coconut, granulated sugar and confectioner's sugar are simple to tint, which makes them even more versatile in decorating. These tips are from CraftyBaking.com."

"Tasty terms take the wedding cake", Courier News, March 26, 2006, "buttercream, fondant, etc." Source: CraftyBaking.com

"There’s panache in the ganache", Herald Democrat, by Edward Southerland, March 24, 2006, "Ganache is what you get when chopped or melted chocolate is beaten into hot cream; when the mixture cools, it can be made into all manner of treats to tempt the palate — chocolate truffles for example. Simple enough; well, not quite. As described at www.CraftyBaking.com: “Ganache is a really a complex combination of an emulsification and a suspension that occurs between the chocolate and cream ingredients. To emulsify the chocolate and cream, the cream is first heated which reduces its water content. The hot cream is poured over the chocolate and it melts after sitting for a few minutes. They are slowly mixed together. The waiting time also serves to bring down its temperature down because emulsions form better at 90 degrees to 110 degrees F. The emulsification takes place by the combination of work or stirring, which breaks down the fat in both the cream and chocolate into microscopic droplets, small enough to be suspended within the water — and the use of an emulsifier to stabilize the system, or fatty acids present in the milk.”

"Towering wedding cakes get extreme makeovers", The Town Talk Alexandria-Pineville, Louisiana, March 22, 2006, "Tasty terms take the wedding cake - Cake and icing terms. Source: CraftyBaking.com."

"Website of the Day for March 22--CraftyBaking.Com", News Channel 5 KSDK, St Louis, March 22, 2006, "There's nothing like staying inside and baking something delicious on a cold day. Our website of the day (CraftyBaking.com) can help you with your baking."

"Cake Know-How", The Shreveport Times (Gannett News Service), March 21, 2006, "In the market for a wedding cake? Here's where to start, according to CraftyBaking.com..."

"Towering wedding cakes get extreme millennium makeovers"tennesean.com, Jolene Ketzenberger, Gannett News Service, March 15, 2006, "Cake and Icing Terms, Source: CraftyBaking.com•  Wedding Cakes You Can Make: Designing, Baking, and Decorating the Perfect Wedding Cake, by Dede Wilson (John Wiley & Sons, $29.95).• The Perfect Wedding Cake, by Kate Manchester (Stewart, Tabori and Chang, $22.50).• The Wedding Cake Book, by Dede Wilson (Wiley, $39.95).• Romantic Wedding Cakes, by Kerry Vincent (Merehurst, $29.95)."

"Chocolate holds many delights to appeal to all your senses", Mercury News/Macon Telegraph, March 15, 2006, "Not all chocolate is alike. It can come in different forms, namely, white, milk and dark chocolate, and with different flavors. And chocolate quality can vary, as well...Here are a few tips on what to look for when chocolate testing...Source: Godiva, CraftyBaking.com

"'Yummy' factor offsets difficulty of baking puff pastry", Commercial Appeal, by Charlotte Durham, March 8, 2006, "Here's how Sarah Phillips, who writes the CraftyBaking.com Web site, explains puff pastry baking..."

"Recipes: Chocolate chip cookies and chocolate fudge cake", twincitiespress, January 24, 2006

"Reshaping tradition: Elegant cake-on-cake style replaces teetering towers of the past", indystar.com, (The Indianapolis Star) by Jolene Ketzenberger, February 1, 2006, "Cake and icing terms...Source: CraftyBaking.com"

"Will sourdough rise to the occasion?", Toronto Star - Canada, by Susan Sampson, February 1, 2006, "A thick starter adapted from CraftyBaking.com and attributed to American pastry chef Nick Malgieri."

"Healthy baking not an oxymoron",

"The First Family of Instagram," The New York Times, by Caroline Moss, December 31, 2015. "Ms. Phillips is the matriarch of what may be called the First Family of Instagram. In addition to the @food handle, she has another account,@baking, which has more than 27,000 followers. Her son, Tom Eswein, 29, is behind @realestate, with its modest but growing following of 3,800. (Until recently, he worked on @food with his mom, but they recently decided to separate their @interests because family is complicated.) Her daughter, Liz Eswein, 25, is the force behind @newyorkcity, which has 1.1 million followers. "

1 - 6 -2015 Meet the ‘first family of Instagram’ on the TODAY Show, NBC News Channel 4
Sarah Phillips, her son Tom Eswein, and her daughter Liz Eswein join Carson Daly in the Orange Room to talk about their popular Instagram posts, saying color, light and clarity are key to a perfect shot.

1-27-2015 MEET the First Family of Instagram who make money by documenting their day-to-day lives, Barcroft Media

Guardian, UK: Sarah Phillips named ONE of the 30 World's Greatest Bakers.

craftybaking.com named "the best of the web" - Saveur Magazine

craftybaking.com named as one of Gourmet Magazine's top 95 favorite food websites and blogs!

Guardian, UK: craftybaking.com, home to some of the best baking know-how on the net..."

Washington Post: "...this is one useful Web site"

Chicago Tribune: "craftybaking.com: an excellent resource for home cooks".

Los Angeles Times:  "craftybaking.com (is) filled with good information and is easy to use. It (has) solid baking information..."

New York Times: "...directions can be found at craftybaking.com".

CNN NEWS: "...visit craftybaking.com"

New York Times “Cake: The Essentials”, Weekly Blogger (2009 - 2010)

Special to washingtonpost.com, "What's Cooking", by Kim O'Donnel, Washington Post, April 10, 2007, "For the cake baker: the CraftyBaking Website has a section that lists pan sizes and their volumes which can be helpful when adjusting a recipe....Kim O'Donnel: Thanks. I like the CraftyBaking site as well, quite useful."

"Free Range on Food, Crummy Valentine's Treats," The Food Section of the Washington Post, February 14, 2007, (QUESTION) "I made a bread recipe designed to produced two loaves of bread....The 1st day's loaf was about 1-2" in higher than the 2nd day's loaf. Any idea why the diff? thanks! (ANSWER) Leigh: It sounds like the main difference is the chilling time. According to Chelsea Lincoln from Bob's Red Mill, the cooler temperature retards the yeast... She also recommends a web site for further bread baking questions. www.CraftyBaking.com with a specific link to bread you may find helpful for trouble shooting in the future. "Special to washingtonpost.com, "What's Cooking", by Kim O'Donnel, Washington Post, April 10, 2007, "For the cake baker: the CraftyBaking Website has a section that lists pan sizes and their volumes which can be helpful when adjusting a recipe....Kim O'Donnel: Thanks. I like the CraftyBaking site as well, quite useful."

Explore Chocolate: Chocolate Glossary, Nestles Chocolatier, uses CraftyBaking.com as a direct source for tempering and chocolate information

"Blog Watch", The Wall Street Journal, Katherine Meyer, April 3, 2006, page R9, "Renowned chocolate chef David Lebovitz's blog is a mix of everyday musings sprinkled with fascinating food trivia, recipes and mouth-watering photos of decadent desserts...Check out the "chocolate-almond butter crunch toffee" and "pumpkin chocolate chip ring (by Sarah Phillips, CraftyBaking.com)."

"The Way We Eat: Free Ranging", New York Times, Amanda Hesser, December 18, 2005, "To coat with chocolate, melt the chocolate in a double boiler (temper it if you want the coating to have polish; directions can be found at CraftyBaking.com)".

"Still can't get enough...(For) more cookie techniques, help, trivia, and history (go to): CraftyBaking's Cookies 101", Martha's Cookies 101 by the Kitchen's of Martha Stewart, 12-05 Julia Child was the other source mentioned.

"What's Cooking Holiday", Special to washingtonpost.com, by Kim O'Donnel, 12-8-05, "You might check out CraftyBaking , which has tips on how to prevent spreading (chocolate chip cookies). I have found the tips on this to be invaluable! Kim O'Donnel: Agreed...this is one useful Web site. Thanks."

Chicago Tribune, 11-2-05 writes: 
"CraftyBaking.com: an excellent resource for home cooks".

Rescue Your Holiday Baking
Does your holiday baking need a rescue? Maybe you need to call CraftyBaking. 
US Newswire / Radio News Feature / GoodNews

CraftyBaking.com's 
"Information is first-rate...
Great troubleshooting tips 
for the novice and seasoned baker alike". 

One of 6 favorite food websites selected by 
Cooking Light Magazine, April, 2005, page 162, circulation 11 million subscribers (Other websites: foodnetwork.com, allrecipes.com, foodsubs.com, egullet.org, cookinglight.com)

Los Angeles Times Review Special Christmas Section (12-16-01) by Carla Williams: CraftyBaking.com (is) filled with good information and is easy to use. It (has) solid baking information along with 4 other sites: General Mills, Land O'Lakes, Nestle and Pillsbury. 
Story reprinted, ktla, 2005

"Holiday Help Lines", Gazette (CO), 12-06, 12-18-05, 11-30-04, "Here’s where to go for culinary help during the holiday season... Baking: verybestbaking.com,CraftyBaking.com and landolakes.com..."

"Cake Decorating", CNN News - Comcast ~ Seeking Solutions with Suzanne, "Did you know there are three types of fondant, the sugar paste used to create edible animals? For more fondant facts and recipes, visit 
CraftyBaking.com!"

CHICAGO TRIBUNE REVIEWS & MENTIONS:
"Sweet discovery summons childhood memories," Chicago Tribune, by Donna Pierce, July 5, 2006, "[Sarah Phillips] shows how to measure a pan's volume and depth by filling it with water to see how much batter it can hold. Using this method, you can figure the number of small pans needed based on the batter used in the larger pan. "Be careful substituting a pan when the recipe indicates that a tube pan should be used, such as an angel food cake pan or a bundt pan," she writes. "Generally the recipe requires this type of pan so the heat is distributed properly."

"Dressing up: Easy, fun strategies turn ordinary Easter cakes into something special", Chicago Tribune, By Robin Mather Jenkins, 4-06, "Shredded coconut, granulated sugar and confectioner's sugar are simple to tint, which makes them even more versatile in decorating. These tips are from CraftyBaking.com."

"Q. Please give me advice about replacing other ingredients with applesauce in baked goods. I remember hearing that I could do this, but don't know how.", Chicago Tribune, By Donna Pierce, 3-8-06, "A. Applesauce often is used to replace fat in baked goods, but substituting it in recipes can be tricky, writes Sarah Phillips in "Baking 9-1-1." It's easiest, she writes, to substitute it in baked goods that use oil, not butter. Candidates include many quick breads, muffins or some cakes, such as carrot cake. When a recipe calls for 1 cup of oil, substitute 3/4 cup applesauce," she writes. "Also add 2 tablespoons vegetable oil for better flavor and mouthfeel. She cautions that you also may need to use additional flavoring, some baking soda to offset the acidic applesauce, and a low-gluten flour.

"Keep paraffin out of the candy jar"Chicago Tribune, By Donna Pierce, 11-2-05, "Some older recipes for dipped candy call for melting paraffin with chocolate to make it firmer and give it a nice sheen upon cooling," writes Sarah Phillips on her Web site, CraftyBaking.com, an excellent resource for home cooks. However, she adds, "The labels on most paraffin boxes state it is not for human consumption, but it is still used."

"Get the scoop on scoops", Chicago Tribune (syndicated Knight-Ridder Newspapers), Renee Enna, 6-05-05, "The Web site www.CraftyBaking.com offers these tips for perfect scoops."

"How best to butter up your cookie batter"Chicago Tribune, Donna Pierce, 1-5-05, 
"Several questions regarding the role of butter and other fats in cookie recipes have rolled into the test kitchen. Q: How do you judge the correct temperature and texture in recipes that require "room temperature" butter — and how do you soften butter quickly. A: For baking considerations, butter at room temperature should register between 65-68 degrees when an instant-read thermometer is inserted in the center of the stick. At this temperature, the butter is firm but leaves an indention when gently pressed. In "CraftyBaking," author Sarah Phillips describes room-temperature butter as firm but bendable, with a shiny but not greasy surface. "

"Get Answers to Cookie Questions", Chicago Tribune, Donna Pierce, 12-16-04, "It's holiday cookie season, and several questions regarding the role of butter and other fats in cookie recipes have rolled into the test kitchen...For baking considerations, room temperature butter should register 65-68 degrees when an instant-read thermometer is inserted in the center of the stick. At this temperature, the butter is firm but leaves an indention when gently pressed. In CraftyBaking (Fireside, 2003), author Sarah Phillips describes room-temperature butter as firm but bendable, with a shiny but not greasy surface."

CHICAGO (IL) TRIBUNE/ Knight-Ridder/Tribune Syndicated, 2-2-04 - (scroll to food) "Baking 9-1-1" (Fireside, $14) offers how-to's for hundreds of cooking techniques and conundrums (from breads and spongecakes to emergency substitutions and culinary rescue missions). Author Sarah Phillips offers dozens of recipes, including one for fantastic oatmeal-raisin cookies. (cdm) 2004

"A cookie worth making"Chicago Tribune, April 21, 2004, "If sweet and chewy translates to cookie bliss, the Jumbo Oatmeal Raisin Cookies from "Baking 9-1-1" (Fireside, $14) (by Sarah Phillips) are a perfect treat. The high oven temperature causes the cookies to puff and set on the outside before the inside sets completely, making a thicker cookie, writesauthor Sarah Phillips, who also advises not to overbake these treats. When we made them in the test kitchen, tasters marveled at the crispy exterior that yielded to a soft and flavorful interior. (Recipe was reprinted without mentioning the use of all-purpose flour (spoon into measuring cup and level to top).

"Fat Tuesday treats to buy -- and make at home", Brenda Wallace, Chicago Tribune, 2-18-04 (see second Q and A), 
Q. I bake and also purchase artisan-type breads, which I keep in the refrigerator to avoid spoilage. I recently purchased a breadbox thinking it had qualities to prevent mold. Is a breadbox supposed to keep breads fresh and prevent spoilage? Or is there something I should put into the box along with the bread? --Dorothy Litwin, Skokie

A. Breadboxes will do the job for short periods of time, writes Laurel Robertson in "The Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book": "If the bread will be eaten in a day or two, it is best stored loosely wrapped at cool room temperature . . . or kept in an old-fashioned breadbox, which offers a cool, dry environment." But make sure the breadbox is ventilated, Robertson writes, and keep it clean between loaves to prevent mold spores from "passing from one batch to the other."

Should you wish to keep bread longer than a day or two, breadboxes don't offer the most ideal storage solution, according to Sarah Phillips in "Baking 9-1-1." And forget about the refrigerator, which dries out bread and hastens staleness, she adds.

For longer bread storage, the freezer is your best bet: Tightly wrapped bread can be kept 2 to 3 months with good results. Frozen bread thaws quickly. And pre-slicing before freezing allows convenient retrieval of a few slices at a time.

"KITCHEN CONNECTION FROM THE TEST KITCHEN - Tapioca to the rescue", Chicago Tribune, Donna Pierce, 2-4-04, "... fruit fillings benefit from the use of instant tapioca as a thickener. They don't require stirring and don't get cloudy as they do when flour is used. from "Baking 9-1-1," author Sarah Phillips ."

"Thickeners vary a bit," Detriot Free Press, by Susan Selansky, April 11, 2007, "QUESTION: What would make my baking sheets warp? -- Helen Engels, Inkster. ANSWER: The baking sheets might not be thick, heavy duty or high quality. Sarah Phillips, CEO and founder of www.CraftyBaking.com, explained in an e-mail: "Cookie sheets naturally warp with use, anyway, because they are just sheets of metal. Some companies like Calphalon insert steel rods along all four sides to prevent this."

"CraftyBaking.com- If you like baking, our Web site of the day is a real find." News Channel 5, St Louis. March 28, 2007, "Check out CraftyBaking.com. You'll find reliable and tested recipes for Easter and Passover, free advice about your baking problems and real life rescues from recipe disasters. There are also baking classes online, which you have to pay for, but there is plenty of free material."

"www.food, What did we ever do before the Web?," St. Paul and Pioneer Press, Kathie Jenkins, March 15, 2007, "What did we ever do before the Web? That's a question....Below are our favorites. Check them out.  CraftyBaking.com: Besides recipes, this site has good technique and how-to instructions, ingredient information, free advice from experts and lots of tips. If you look up something like walnuts, the site explains how to blanch, how to toast, what to substitute. There's also a members' photo gallery, so you can post your baking creations."

"The Story of Dutch Cocoa," Newsday and published nationwide (ie: San Jose Mercury News, CABaltimore Sun, MD; etc), by Erica Marcus, February 21, 2007, "Before I started researching this column, I was under the impression that Dutch-process cocoa was a) more richly flavored than "natural" cocoa and b) more easily soluble in water. I know now that I was mistaken, and I credit these sources for opening my eyes: "Bittersweet: Recipes and Tales From a Life in Chocolate" by Alice Medrich (Artisan) and ...excellent Web sites: CraftyBaking.com...."

"Free Range on Food, Crummy Valentine's Treats," The Food Section of the Washington Post, February 14, 2007, (QUESTION) "I made a bread recipe designed to produced two loaves of bread. Since I only have one loaf pan, I baked one loaf on the day I made the dough. For the second loaf, after the 1st rising, I put it in a zip lock bag and placed it in the refrigerator. The following day, I put it in the pan, let it rise for a few hours till it was near the top of the pan and baked it (the dough was cool to the touch when I baked it). I compared the two baked loaves. The 1st day's loaf was about 1-2" in higher than the 2nd day's loaf. Any idea why the diff? thanks (ANSWER) Leigh: It sounds like the main difference is the chilling time. According to Chelsea Lincoln from Bob's Red Mill, the cooler temperature retards the yeast. It needs the warmth to gain elasticity and work with the gluten in the flour. If you bring the dough fully to room temperature and allow it to rise again you will likely get good results. She also recommends a web site for further bread baking questions.www.CraftyBaking.com with a specific link to bread you may find helpful for trouble shooting in the future."

"Rolling in the Dough," Press-Enterprise, Janet Zimmerman, January 16, 2007, The smell of fresh-baked bread laced with honey fills the cramped kitchen at Riverside's Jammin' Bread....Bread Terms from CraftyBaking.com."

"Ethnic coffee cakes a staple in Pennsylvania kitchens," Pittsburgh Tribune Review, by Karin Welzel, December 31, 2006, These ethnic coffee cakes and sweet breads are perfect to serve for breakfast, brunch, afternoon tea, a snack or even as dessert. Baba, Babka: A Polish sweet bread or cake with dried fruits, candied peel and nuts that is soaked in rum or cherry brandy. It is baked in a fluted pan so the bottom resembles a woman's skirt. Supposedly invented by Polish King Stanislaus Lesczyinski in the 1600s, who soaked stale kugelhopf in rum and name the dessert after Ali Baba, the storybook hero; Bienenstich (Bee Sting Cake): Cake layers made from yeast dough or leavened batter that are filled with custard or jam and covered with a honey- or sugar-based topping and nuts. From Germany; Chelsea buns: Square yeast rolls flavored with warm spices and fruit and coated with sugar. Developed by the Chelsea Bun House, a bakery in London, England, that opened for business in the 1700s. They resemble American cinnamon rolls. The Chelsea Bun House also was famous for hot cross buns, traditionally served on Good Friday; Christopsomo: A Christmas egg bread from Greece flavored with anise. The dough is shaped into large round loaves and decorated with the sign of an early Christian cross; Kolachy: Sweet yeast buns filled with poppy seeds, nuts, jam, or mashed fruit; origins are Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia; Kugelhopf (Gugelhopf): An Austrian sweet bread/cake that can be made from a yeast dough or a batter leavened with baking powder. Characterized by baking in a molded pan that's called a Turk's Head Pan (turban-shaped with swirled sides). This usually contains dried fruits and citrus peel. Bakers in Germany, Poland and Alsace, France, often claim it as their own invention; Kulich: A sweet yeast bread of Russian origins, shaped in a tall cylinder. It often is flavored with raisins, candied fruit and saffron and features a confectioners' sugar icing; Moravian sugar cake: A yeast-based sweet, flat coffee cake, topped with sugar, popularized by the Moravians, who migrated from present-day Czech Republic and settled in Pennsylvania. Characterized by indentations in the dough, into which syrup is poured before baking; Pannetone: This is the dome-shaped Christmas bread of Italy, made from a yeast sponge and a variety of liquor-soaked dried fruits and citrus peel. Recipes vary from region to region; the bread usually is baked in a high-sided pan, but a springform pan can be used; Potica: Thinly stretch yeast dough filled with ground walnuts and cooked in honey and milk. Originated in Bohemia and Slovenia; Stollen, Dresden Stollen, Christstollen: A traditional German yeast bread studded with nuts and dried fruit; Streusel Kuchen: There's no one recipe for this German coffeecake -- made from yeast dough or a baking powder batter -- but all of them feature a crumb topping. They often are baked in Bundt pans.

Sources: CraftyBaking.com; "Food Lover's Companion" (Barron's Educational Series, Third Edition, $16.95 paperback) by Sharon Tyler Herbst; "Christmas 101: Celebrate the Holiday Season -- from Christmas to New Year's" (Broadway Books, 1999 paperback) by Rick Rodgers."

"Kitchen Hotlines to the Rescue," Colorado Gazette, December, 2006, "BAKING: www.verybestbaking.com, www.CraftyBaking.com, www.landolakes.com..."

"Truth about scalding," Herald Tribune, by Linda Brandt, December 20, 2006, "Older recipes called for scalding milk for two reasons: to kill bacteria and to eliminate an enzyme that keeps it from thickening in recipes. According to ochef.com, scalding to accomplish those two things is no longer necessary as virtually all milk sold in the U.S. is pasteurized, which kills bacteria and the enzyme. Another Web site, baking 911.com, notes that some recipes may ask you to scald and cool milk just to be sure it is at a good temperature (110-115 F) for combining with other ingredients. Shirley O. Corriher, a food scientist and author of "Cookwise" (Morrow, 1997), noticed that when she didn't scald milk for certain bread recipes, the bread didn't rise as high as it did when she used scalded milk."

"A gingerbread cottage by the sea," The Orange County Register, by Lisa Mertins, December 14, 2006, "During the hectic, out-of-control holiday season, what could be a better project than attempting to create a gingerbread house? Sources: www.CraftyBaking.com for fondant recipe."

"Bundt baking," Worcester Telegram & Gazette Corp., by Barbara M. Houle, December 6, 2006, "About Nordic Ware: The aluminum Bundt pan was invented by H. David Dalquist, founder of Nordic Ware Bundt Pans, at the request of a Hadassah group in Minneapolis. The women wanted a pan that could be used to make kugel, according to CraftyBaking.com. Dalquist created the pan, which they named “bund,” German for a gathering of people. Dalquist added a “t” to the end of “bund” and trademarked the name."

"Website of the Month, December, 2006: CraftyBaking - Candy 101: http://www.CraftyBaking.com/candy/101_intro.htm, December, 2006, East Baton Rouge Parish Library, Louisiana

"Dancing with Elephants", PODCAST PICKLE: DWE Episode 033: Live at The Magnificent Mile 2006 Lights Festival, November 19, 2006, "Items featured on this week's show: The Magnificent Mile Walt Disney World Red Frosting Baking 911..."

"Bakery specializes in pies using fruits supplied by customer," Associated Press (Nationwide), Martha Mendoza, November 15, 2006, "I have to say I felt guilty for not baking it myself, but at the same time, pie shells are always a risky business. I can't be sure they'll come out well. For this gift, it just had to look and taste good," said Weckler. Baking maven Sarah Phillips, a cookbook author who runs CraftyBaking.com, said Weckler's pie crust reluctance may be well founded.

"People are afraid of pie crusts and it's understandable," she said. "Pie making is really a skill, and if you only do it once a year at Thanksgiving, you're going to be kind of rusty."

Phillips said pie crusts are easy enough that no one should need to buy pre-made pie crusts. But for those in a hurry, or crust-a-phobic, grocery stores now carry a range of empty pie shells ranging from organic whole wheat crusts to frozen rolled-up versions."

"10 things we learned this week," The Toronto Star, by John Sakamoto, November 12, 2006, "Wednesday is National Bundt Day. The oddly shaped pan was invented in 1950 at the request of members of the Minneapolis Center of the Hadassah Society, who wanted a pan in which to make kugel, a Jewish dessert. " (from CraftyBaking.com)
"Chris Miura's method for baking real-deal pizza at home," The Honolulu Advertiser, a division of Gannett Co, Inc, by  Wanda A. Adams, November 8, 2006, "Bread-making tips from CraftyBaking.com."
"Here's the skinny on heavy cream," Times Union, Albany, by Mary Quinlan, August 23, 2006, " Q: What's the difference between heavy cream and whipping cream?-- Anonymous A: CraftyBaking.com says heavy cream is the richest type of liquid cream with a fat content of at least 36 percent, while whipping cream contains between 30 percent and 36 percent fat.

For whipping, you need a minimum of 30 percent fat. Whipping cream and heavy cream can be substituted for each other, but the higher the fat content, the higher and firmer the cream will whip up, which will give you a thicker and more stable frosting, perfect for piping through a pastry bag.

For ideal whipped cream: Store a metal mixing bowl and mixers in the freezer for 30 minutes. Mix cream until stiff peaks form. Toward the end of whipping, add 1 to 2 tablespoons of superfine or confectioners' sugar per cup of cream and flavorings (such as 1/4 teaspoon almond extract or 1/2 to 1 teaspoon vanilla extract). Don't over whip, or the cream will turn to butter."

"Light Life: Apple Spice Cake," Slash Food, by Nicole Weston, August 8, 2006, "After much testing, cookbook author Sarah Phillips, came up with a whole book of all-natural, low fat recipes, The Healthy Oven Baking Book. This cake is a variation on one of the recipes from that book - and it has almost no fat...The cake itself is very good. It is very moist and has something of an addictive quality about it, so it's a good thing that it is so low in fat. All of the tricks that the author used to avoid denseness, gumminess and toughness worked well, because the cake is none of those things. The spice combination used reminds me distinctly of apple pie, with a slight nuttiness from the whole wheat pastry flour rounding out the flavors. I like it for breakfast or with coffee, but it could be served for dessert, too, perhaps with a small scoop of (low fat) ice cream or frozen yogurt."

"Freeze sorbet, can mulberries, bake a cake", St. Paul/Pioneer Press, by Lynda Kochevar, July 29, 2006, "Q. Can you find a recipe for hummingbird cake? A. This one was originally published in Southern Living magazine in 1978 and was chosen favorite recipe ever in 1990 by that magazine. I found it at www.CraftyBaking.com."

"Different Pan Size, making it work", Baltimore Sun, July 19, 2006, "We found Sarah Phillips' pan-conversion chart (which compares baking-pan size and volume) so handy that we printed a copy from her Web site, CraftyBaking.com..."

Rose Teaches Master Class, Lekue Silicone StyleHarold Import Company, June 22, 2006,  "In June, HIC hosted its first-ever master baking class – co-hosted by Lékué International and taught by the pastry professor emeritus – Rose Levy Beranbaum. At The Institute of Culinary Education, at the stroke of noon our students arrived – 14 editors representing a wide sampling of publications in the gourmet and houseware industries – attendees included Associated Press, CraftyBaking.comCountry LivingFine CookingFood and WineFood Arts MagazineFood CalendarGood HousekeepingGourmet MagazineGourmet Retailer and Saveur along with a number of independent food writers."

"Devil's food cake is a real slice of heaven", Toronto Star, by Susan Sampson, June 19, 2006, "Get back to basics with a festive, homemade cake. The base is a traditional devil's food, light and moist. The icing starts as a chocolate ganache, a classic glaze. Chocolate Birthday Cake. The cake is adapted from an old Joy of Cooking recipe and the icing from CraftyBaking.com."

"Two-Minute Expert: Size matters with Bundt pans," Press Enterprise, May 24, 2006, "If you're unsure how much batter your beautiful Bundt pan will hold, there's a quick way to measure its capacity...Source: CraftyBaking.com."

"ASK THE TEST KITCHEN: Substitution requires care," Detroit Free Press, by Susan Selasky, May 3, 2006, "QUESTION: How can I substitute baking chocolate squares for cocoa powder? -- Lisa Mazzola, Farmington Hills. ANSWER: Unsweetened chocolate squares can be used instead of cocoa powder, but you'll also need to adjust the fat in the recipe. In "Baking 9-1-1" by Sarah Phillips (Fireside, $14), which features frequently asked baking questions and recipes, the author gives this formula when asked how to make a cake more chocolaty: "If a chocolate cake has cocoa powder, substitute about 2 or 3 chocolate squares per recipe." The fat ingredient in the recipe will need to be adjusted because you are adding fat (cocoa butter) in the recipe by using the chocolate squares. Phillips writes that "3 level tablespoons Dutch-process or natural cocoa PLUS 1 tablespoon oil or melted shortening or butter equals 1 square of unsweetened baking chocolate."...Other factors need to be considered when making this substitution, Phillips, CEO and founder of www.CraftyBaking.com, wrote in an e-mail. 'When you exchange the cocoa powder and fat with chocolate squares, it also affects the flour, leaveners, sugar and liquid in the recipe. When you take cocoa powder from a recipe, you have to replace it with flour. Cocoa powder contains starch and helps provide structure. And the butter or fat in the recipe may need to be adjust downwards along with the sugar depending on the type of chocolate used. With the liquid you may need to adjust upwards or downwards.' "

"Dressing up: Easy, fun strategies turn ordinary Easter cakes into something special", 7-Cities Wine and Dine, By Robin Mather Jenkins from the Chicago Tribune, 4-06, "Shredded coconut, granulated sugar and confectioner's sugar are simple to tint, which makes them even more versatile in decorating. These tips are from CraftyBaking.com."

"Tasty terms take the wedding cake", Courier News, March 26, 2006, "buttercream, fondant, etc." Source: CraftyBaking.com

"There’s panache in the ganache", Herald Democrat, by Edward Southerland, March 24, 2006, "Ganache is what you get when chopped or melted chocolate is beaten into hot cream; when the mixture cools, it can be made into all manner of treats to tempt the palate — chocolate truffles for example. Simple enough; well, not quite. As described at www.CraftyBaking.com: “Ganache is a really a complex combination of an emulsification and a suspension that occurs between the chocolate and cream ingredients. To emulsify the chocolate and cream, the cream is first heated which reduces its water content. The hot cream is poured over the chocolate and it melts after sitting for a few minutes. They are slowly mixed together. The waiting time also serves to bring down its temperature down because emulsions form better at 90 degrees to 110 degrees F. The emulsification takes place by the combination of work or stirring, which breaks down the fat in both the cream and chocolate into microscopic droplets, small enough to be suspended within the water — and the use of an emulsifier to stabilize the system, or fatty acids present in the milk.”

"Towering wedding cakes get extreme makeovers", The Town Talk Alexandria-Pineville, Louisiana, March 22, 2006, "Tasty terms take the wedding cake - Cake and icing terms. Source: CraftyBaking.com."

"Website of the Day for March 22--CraftyBaking.Com", News Channel 5 KSDK, St Louis, March 22, 2006, "There's nothing like staying inside and baking something delicious on a cold day. Our website of the day (CraftyBaking.com) can help you with your baking."

"Cake Know-How", The Shreveport Times (Gannett News Service), March 21, 2006, "In the market for a wedding cake? Here's where to start, according to CraftyBaking.com..."

"Towering wedding cakes get extreme millennium makeovers"tennesean.com, Jolene Ketzenberger, Gannett News Service, March 15, 2006, "Cake and Icing Terms, Source: CraftyBaking.com•  Wedding Cakes You Can Make: Designing, Baking, and Decorating the Perfect Wedding Cake, by Dede Wilson (John Wiley & Sons, $29.95).• The Perfect Wedding Cake, by Kate Manchester (Stewart, Tabori and Chang, $22.50).• The Wedding Cake Book, by Dede Wilson (Wiley, $39.95).• Romantic Wedding Cakes, by Kerry Vincent (Merehurst, $29.95)."

"Chocolate holds many delights to appeal to all your senses", Mercury News/Macon Telegraph, March 15, 2006, "Not all chocolate is alike. It can come in different forms, namely, white, milk and dark chocolate, and with different flavors. And chocolate quality can vary, as well...Here are a few tips on what to look for when chocolate testing...Source: Godiva, CraftyBaking.com

"'Yummy' factor offsets difficulty of baking puff pastry", Commercial Appeal, by Charlotte Durham, March 8, 2006, "Here's how Sarah Phillips, who writes the CraftyBaking.com Web site, explains puff pastry baking..."

"Recipes: Chocolate chip cookies and chocolate fudge cake", twincitiespress, January 24, 2006

"Reshaping tradition: Elegant cake-on-cake style replaces teetering towers of the past", indystar.com, (The Indianapolis Star) by Jolene Ketzenberger, February 1, 2006, "Cake and icing terms...Source: CraftyBaking.com"

"Will sourdough rise to the occasion?", Toronto Star - Canada, by Susan Sampson, February 1, 2006, "A thick starter adapted from CraftyBaking.com and attributed to American pastry chef Nick Malgieri."

"Healthy baking not an oxymoron", azcentral (Arizona), By Stacey Morris, January 31, 2006. See below.

"Baker's mission: reduce calories, retain flavor", St. Paul Pioneer Press, by Stacey Morris, January 24, 2006, "Baking experts and nutritionists agree that with a few easy substitutions, favorite recipes can be transformed into healthier versions of baked treats without sacrificing flavor and enjoyment. Lifelong baker Sarah Phillips, author of "The Healthy Oven Baking Book," (Doubleday; 1999) saw no reason why muffins and cakes had to have a day's worth of calories in a single serving, so she set about on a lengthy course of baking experimentation that ultimately led to her book....The revised recipe and others like it are on her Web site, http://www. CraftyBaking.com ..."

"Recipes: Chocolate chip cookies and chocolate fudge cake", St. Paul Pioneer Press, January 24, 2006, Recipes by Sarah Phillips

"Baker sifts out fat, calories from her sweets"Special to the Times Union, By Stacey Morris, January 18, 2006, "Baking experts and nutritionists agree that with a few easy substitutions, favorite recipes can be transformed into healthier versions of baked treats without sacrificing flavor and enjoyment. Lifelong baker Sarah Phillips, author of "The Healthy Oven Baking Book," (Doubleday; 1999) saw no reason why muffins and cakes had to have a day's worth of calories in a single serving, so she set about on a lengthy course of baking experimentation that ultimately led to her book....The revised recipe and others like it are on her Web site, http://www. CraftyBaking.com ..."

"How to pick the best oranges and what to do with them...Put zest in your life" Dallas Morning News, By Joyce Saenz Harris, January 3, 2005, "Citrus peel, also called zest, contains oils that deliver a lot of flavor. For best results, zest first, then juice the fruit. You want only the colored part of the peel; the white pith underneath is bitter. Wash and dry the fruit, then use the zest...." Source: www.CraftyBaking.com

"Go hog-wild this holiday season Gingerbread pigs can be a tasty tradition", Concord (NH) Monitor, by Hillary Nelson, December 14, 2005, "To use royal icing: The simplest thing to do is to spread the cookies with royal icing using a knife or small spatula. If you'd like to make detailed decorations on the cookie, you'll need to use some sort of a piping bag. Piping bags and tips can be bought at a cake decorating supplier. You can also make piping bags out of parchment paper triangles rolled into cones (for instructions on making paper cones, visit http://www.CraftyBaking.com/decorating/pb_prchmtcones_pg2.htm).

"Chewing on some homemade caramel tips", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Dec. 11, 2005, "Making homemade caramels? Follow these tips for a smoother process...For more advice on caramel making, visit http://www.CraftyBaking.com/candy/caramels.htm."

"Holiday cookie contest", Palm Beach Post, Jan Norris, December 8, 2005, "Cookie Baking 101:More tips for fixing cookie malfunctions. Cookies seem so innocent and simple - cooks can churn out dozens at a time, and recipes are straightforward enough for kids to handle. But the problems they can cause can bring on kitchen tantrums. Sources: Better Homes and Gardens Christmas Cookies; Shirley Corriher, author of CookWise; CraftyBaking.com, joyofbaking.com.

"Bake up Winter Warmth with Homemade Herbal Breads" and "Convert Your Handmade Bread Recipes for Use with Bread Machines", Herb Companion, by Susan Belsinger, December 1, 2005,  "For more information on recipe conversions, visit http://www.CraftyBaking.com/bread/machines.htm "

"Cuisine Quest"Salt Lake Tribune, Kathy Stephenson, November 23, 2005,"This time of year, most families just have to make - and decorate - sugar cookies. 
And about every recipe...calls for "creaming" the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. 
Many may not realize this is one of the most important steps in baking recipes, explains Sarah Phillips in CraftyBaking: Rescue from Recipe Disaster (Fireside Book; $14). Creaming introduces air into the mixture and makes it light and fluffy.
Phillips said it usually takes...5 ...minutes on medium speed to reach the right texture and pale ivory color. Be careful not to overbeat as the butter can soften too much, diminishing its ability to hold air.
Phillips offers a few clues to determine if you have creamed properly: Volume of the butter and sugar has increased; color of the butter has become lighter, usually a pale ivory; texture becomes fluffy; the mixture has numerous ridges in it from the beaters and is sticky when they are lifted; the mixture coats the bottom and slightly up the sides of the bowl; and when touched, it will have the consistency of thick, gritty (from the sugar) facial cream."

"Pastries gone postal. Make shipping your baked goods a piece of cake", mke home and life, by Laura Gawrisch, November 3, 2005, Sources: www.CraftyBaking.com; "The Cake Mix Doctor," by Anne Byrn; "Tips on Ordering and Shipping Foods Through the Mail," North Carolina State University

"Food processor: Put your PC to work in the kitchen - Let your computer be your sous-chef this holiday season", Microsoft Home Magazine, by Alyson Munroe, November, 2005, "Find culinary inspiration online. Unless you're an expert, she says, you should only use websites that test their recipes, like Epicuious, Food & Drink magazine, and CraftyBaking.

"My meringue gently weeps", St Louis Post Dispatch, September 14, 2005, "HELLO, THIS IS for some good bakers out there. Can you please tell me how to keep the meringue in a cream pie from weeping? Do you cool it before you put it in the refrigerator or what do you do? I would like to make a cream pie with meringue on top and not have my meringue weep. Please tell me what to do. Thank you. Editor's note: Refrigeration is not recommended; it causes weeping sooner. www.CraftyBaking.com recommends various ways to prevent weeping. They include adding cornstarch, piping gel, precooking the meringue and making sure the sugar is dissolved thoroughly."

"Cooking tips from A to Z", The Seattle Times, August 26, 2005, Sources: "Williams-Sonoma Kitchen Companion"; "Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking with over 230 Great-Tasting Recipes" by Shirley O. Corriher; "The Kitchen Hand: A Miscellany of Kitchen Wisdom" by Anthony Telford; "365 Quick Tips: Kitchen Tricks and Shortcuts to Make You a Faster, Smarter, Better Cook" by the editors of Cook's Illustrated Magazine; "Baking 9-1-1: Rescue from Recipe Disasters" by Sarah Phillips; "The Penguin Companion to Food" by Alan Davidson; "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" by Julia Child, Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle

"The Catch's Grown-Up Root Beer Float", The Orange County Register, by Register Food Editor, August 18, 2005, "Optional garnish: White chocolate "cigarette" (for instructions on how to make them, go to www.CraftyBaking.com/decorating/chocolate.htm)"

"Baker's ammonia", Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN), August 3, 2005, "Sarah Phillips, author of "Baking 9-1-1," wrote on her Web site (CraftyBaking.com) that in addition to King Arthur Flour, baker's ammonia is sold by Sweet Celebrations. They have a catalog, too, and a toll-free number. Write to Sweet Celebrations Inc., P.O. Box 39426, Edina, Minn. 55439-0426 or call (800) 328-6722. Phillips also said that some pharmacies sell baker's ammonia, and it's also found at some ethnic groceries, particularly European or Middle Eastern shops."

"Dinner Bell: Cook to impress with spirited flames of fiery desserts"Arkansas-Democrat Gazette, Irene Wassell, August 3, 2005, "Most of us are "aaahed" when served anything that has alcohol poured over it and set afire. Bananas Foster and Cherries Jubilee come to mind quickly...Following are guidelines for flambéing from the Web site CraftyBaking.com"

"Flay will play, share grill talk at Hard Rock...Weep for those wimpy meringues no more"Orlando Sentinel, (FL), Heather McPherson, June 29, 2005, "Recently a reader called seeking a remedy for weepy meringues on her lemon pies...CraftyBaking.com recommends..."

"Cooking ideas", NAPSA, (10,000 US newspapers), "The kitchen can be a great place for families to get together and practice teamwork. One of the best ways to get children involved in the baking process is to bake with yeast dough. It's fun to play with, easy to make and can also inspire creativity in kids, say experts at www.CraftyBaking.com. For tips and recipes the family can make together, visit Fleischmann's Yeast at www.breadworld.com."

"Heavenly biscuits not recipe from Crocker's"Beacon Journal (Ohio), Debby Stock Kiefer, 6-15-05, "Here are tips on making biscuits, most of them from www.CraftyBaking.com".

"The scoop on scoops"gmtoday.com (Knight-Ridder Newspapers)Clarion-Ledger, 6-14-05, "The Web site www.CraftyBaking.com offers these tips for perfect scoops."

"Sandwich sayings made easy", The Telegraph, 5-11-05, "With so many new breads, ingredients and styles of sandwiches, it sometimes feels as though you need a dictionary just to know what you're ordering or shopping for. Here are some of the sandwich words - both old and new - to watch for in cookbooks, on menus or while shopping at bakeries and markets...Sources: Webster's New World Dictionary of Culinary Arts (Prentice Hall, $27.95) www.CraftyBaking.com; Bread Bakers Guild of America.

"Raising the bar - Americans developing a taste for finer chocolates", MetroTimes (Detroit), Ric Bohy, 4-20-05, "Plenty of information on chocolate is to be found online, one of the best sites being cookbook author Sarah Phillips’ CraftyBaking.com."

"New food column seeks to answer readers' questions," The Free Lance-Star Publishing Co. of Fredericksburg, Va., 4-20-05, "Howell suggested the following resources for finding out more about pies: "The Pie and Pastry Bible" by Rose Levy Beranbaum and "Pie" by Ken Haedrich. On the Internet, check out CraftyBaking.com and epicurious.com...I've also included a single pie crust recipe from CraftyBaking.com."

"Baking and decorating a cake", HELP!tv, (Canada), Comcast, 3-30-05

"Two-Minute Expert: Softening brown sugar" Dallas (TX) Morning News, Linda Ehret, 3-18-05, "The best way to keep brown sugar supple is to store it in an airtight container in a cool, dry place. An airtight plastic bag in the pantry works just fine. For extra assurance, keep a piece of bread in the container with the sugar. SOURCES: Imperial Sugar Co.; CraftyBaking.com"

"Two-Minute Expert: Line a baking pan"Dallas (TX) Morning News, Linda Ehret, 3-11-05, "Make a "sling" out of foil to easily lift sturdy bar cookies out of their pan for clean cutting and easy cleanup. SOURCES: CraftyBaking.com; Fine Cooking Holiday Baking"

"Proper flour sifting and measuring can make a dramatic difference",  Commercial Appeal (TN), 3-9-05, "...Speaking of a canister, Sarah Phillips reminds us in her book "Baking 9-1-1" that "flour doesn't keep forever and is more susceptible to spoilage than you might think. If flour is stored improperly or for too long -- especially whole-wheat flour -- it can develop a rancid flavor. The fat from the germ in whole grain flour can rot over time, and you can tell by smelling it. Phillips recommends storing white flours in a dark, cool pantry in an airtight container. She doesn't recommend refrigerating or freezing white flour, but she said she does freeze her whole-wheat flour to give it a longer shelf life. "

"Dr. McCay’s Miracle Loaf", Mother Earth News, Issue # 208 — February/March 2005, "McCay’s original recipe is for manual baking. If you’d like to try it in a bread machine, go to www.CraftyBaking.com/bread_machines.htm for formulas to convert regular bread recipes to be made in machines..."

"HELP! What Do I Do When...", FoodSmarts, (American Media Publication), November, 2004 - March, 2005, Nationwide in supermarkets and Wal-Mart. Article on "Answers to some of the most frequently asked baking questions" by Sarah Phillips, excerpt from Baking 9-1-1, Simon and Schuster, 2003

"Baking Up Family Fun"NAPSI with Fleischmann's Yeast (10,000 US newspapers, January - February, 2005), "I have found that children love to touch, play and feel dough, especially kneading it and smacking it down from the first rise," says Sarah Philips, founder of the Web site www.CraftyBaking.com and author of "Baking 9-1-1: Rescue From Recipe Disasters." She offers these tips for baking with yeast..."

"February is Bake For Family Fun Month", Associated Release Service, 2- 2005

"Recipes Lost to Time", The York Dispatch, Tammy Motter, 1-26-05, "And Janice Bissonette of York is looking for some help with technique in making whipped cream....The Web site CraftyBaking.com says to 'Beat [the cream] on low speed until small bubbles form, about 30 seconds and then increase to medium then high. Move the beaters of the hand-held electric mixer up, down and around the sides of the bowl while whipping. Just before it becomes soft and billowy, slowly add the sugar and any other flavorings (1 teaspoons sugar for 1 cups of cream) at the sides of the bowl and continue to mix.'"

"From tart to sweet, citrus in winter covers the range", Asheville (NC) Citizen-Times, Rick McDaniel, 1-11-05, "This time of year area markets are exploding with fresh citrus fruit. You know about oranges and grapefruit, but what's a Honey Bell? Have you ever sunk your teeth into a Satsuma?...Types of Citrus Fruit...Storage Tips..."

"Great Cakes: When it comes to baking, the secret is in the science", Sioux Falls Magazine, Kristen Parish Lueth, January, 2005, "It smells wonderful. You followed the directions. But why does your cake lean to one side? How come it doesn't look like the picture in the cookbook?...Information adapted from CraftyBaking.com".

"How best to butter up your cookie batter"
Chicago Tribune/ Ledger-Inquirer (Columbus, GA), Donna Pierce, 12-29-04  
Chicago Tribune/ The Seattle Times, Donna Pierce, 1-5-05,
"Several questions regarding the role of butter and other fats in cookie recipes have rolled into the test kitchen. Q: How do you judge the correct temperature and texture in recipes that require "room temperature" butter — and how do you soften butter quickly. A: For baking considerations, butter at room temperature should register between 65-68 degrees when an instant-read thermometer is inserted in the center of the stick. At this temperature, the butter is firm but leaves an indention when gently pressed. In "CraftyBaking," author Sarah Phillips describes room-temperature butter as firm but bendable, with a shiny but not greasy surface. "

"Symbols of the Season: Christmas Carols", Courier-Post (NJ), Eileen Oczkowski, 12-25-04, "Christmas cookies...have been a part of celebrations long before the first Christmas...Visit www.CraftyBaking.com/baking_terms_c.htm"

"Condensed Milk Caramel", Herald Tribune (FL), Linda Brandt, 12-23-04, "After a recent column on the differences between evaporated and condensed milks, several readers sent in their recipes for making caramel from sweetened condensed milk in the can. For safety reasons, Eagle Brand discourages this practice and offers these suggestions instead. I found them atwww.CraftyBaking.com..."

"Two-Minute Expert: What is Cream of Tartar?", Dallas Morning News, Laura Ehret, 12-17-04. "Technically, cream of tartar is potassium acid tartrate or tartaric acid..." SOURCES: Fine Cooking Holiday Baking; CraftyBaking.com

"Get Answers to Cookie Questions", Chicago Tribune and Sun Sentinel (South Florida), Donna Pierce, 12-16-04, "It's holiday cookie season, and several questions regarding the role of butter and other fats in cookie recipes have rolled into the test kitchen...For baking considerations, room temperature butter should register 65-68 degrees when an instant-read thermometer is inserted in the center of the stick. At this temperature, the butter is firm but leaves an indention when gently pressed. In CraftyBaking (Fireside, 2003), author Sarah Phillips describes room-temperature butter as firm but bendable, with a shiny but not greasy surface."

"Two-Minute Expert: Softening Butter", Dallas Morning News (TX), WVEC (Norfolk, VA) and K5 News (Seattle, WA), Laura Ehret, 12-10-04, "There's that moment when the urge to bake strikes. But the butter's cold..." SOURCE: CraftyBaking.com "

"Fudge Fantasies", Arkansas Morning News, by Marla Hinkle, 12-10-04, "Cooks at CraftyBaking.com agree that the secret to creamy and smooth fudge is candy full of thousands of tiny sugar crystals...Experts at CraftyBaking.com prefer sweet butter because of its added flavor."

"Thanksgiving Recipes", Detroit Free Press, 11-23-04, Pumpkin Creme Brulee Recipe, Adapted from www.CraftyBaking.com and "The Dessert Bible" by Christopher Kimball. Tested by Susan Selasky for the Free Press Test Kitchen.

Fine Living Television, Need to Know: Food Storage - The kitchen is the heart of the home! Show some love and store your food with care, so it’s always at its freshest. #3 - CraftyBaking.com

"Two-Minute Expert: Roasting nuts", Dallas Morning News, by Laura Ehret, November 19, 2004, "Woo-hoo! We're giving you three cooking techniques for roasting nuts in minutes"...sources: CraftyBaking.com

"Don't crack up while trying to hide cheesecake cracks", Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, by Suzanne Martinson, 11-14-04, "Find out how to prevent cheesecakes from cracking," I hollered. No sooner had the prescient words escaped my lips than he appeared with a printout of a "solution" from something known as www.CraftyBaking.com -- Cheesecake 101division...This online expert -- "Sarah's Tips" -- even had the explanation of why vs. why not: If the cheesecake contains a starc